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Advance for Health Information Professionals • January 2017

ADVANCE FOR HEALTH INFORMATION PROFESSIONALS / PROFESSIONAL ISSUES A project is much more likely to be successful if everyone understands the purpose and can see progress toward achievable, measurable goals. metric. This level of specificity for desired outcomes does two things: 1. It articulates precisely how the app will be used and by whom, and it tells end users there are specific benefits―it answers the question “Why?”’ Clear objectives keep project teams focused and on target, with the motivation needed to address any roadblocks that come up and keep activities moving forward. A project is much more likely to be successful if everyone understands the purpose and can see progress toward achievable, measurable goals. 2. The second reason I see projects fail, even ones with a CIO/CMIO partnership at the helm, is if a solution is handed off as a technical implementation without continued involvement from clinical teams and strategic leadership. Buying a solution for the right reasons doesn’t necessarily translate into a successful solution. That clinical and technical partnership with key champions and leaders needs to be sustained throughout a rollout for the whys and the value to translate to end users (and ultimately patients). That value is key to the change management required for solution adoption. Clearly, the big goals on a CIO’s plate, including data security and physician satisfaction, do not have simple solutions―they are complex challenges that require new technology, upgraded infrastructures, a detailed understanding of clinical processes and a heavy dose of change management and human behavior. Perhaps one way to approach some of these big-picture challenges is to think about reengineering not just the technology, but also the process of technology change itself. Brian Edds is vice president of product strategy, Spok. 22 RELATED CONTENT Changing Role of Healthcare CIOs Chief information officers increasingly are drivers of innovation in clinical areas. JANUARY 2017 Be extraordinary – Join the fight! Join our world class team of dedicated and compassionate stakeholders at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center in Zion, IL. Now Hiring: Facilities Specialty Coder – Work Remote! Must have Certification as RHIT, RHIA, or CCS and at least two years’ coding experience with knowledge of ICD-10- CM diagnostic/procedural codes and CPT-4. We Fight Cancer: Care That Never Quits® Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) delivers an extraordinary patient experience we call Patient Empowered Care.® We provide state-of-the-art, high quality care through an integrative model where a team of experts puts patients at the center of their own care. We offer competitive training resources and compensation programs. If you’re looking for a world-class team in a dynamic environment, we invite you to apply. illinoisjobs.cancercenter.com


Advance for Health Information Professionals • January 2017
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